Dysfunctional attitudes or extreme response style as predictors of depressive relapse and recurrence after mobile cognitive therapy for recurrent depression.

by Brouwer, Marlies E., Williams, Alishia D., Forand, Nicholas R., DeRubeis, Robert J. and Bockting, Claudi L. H.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: According to previous research, dysfunctional attitudes and/or scoring extreme on the end-point anchors of questionnaires of dysfunctional thinking predict depressive relapse/recurrence. Evidence that these two methods represent a risk for depressive relapse/recurrence is however mixed, due to differential or poorly defined concepts. The current study aimed to test the two methods. METHODS: Remitted recurrently depressed patients with low residual depressive symptoms (N = 264) were recruited as part of a randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness of mobile Cognitive Therapy for recurrent depression versus treatment as usual. In the current secondary analysis, Cox regression models were conducted to test dysfunctional attitudes and extreme responding variables (assessed on the Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale [DAS]) as predictors of depressive relapse/recurrence within two years after randomization. RESULTS: Data from 255 participants were analyzed. Results showed that DAS total scores at baseline significantly predicted depressive relapse/recurrence (Hazard Ratio [HR] = 1.01, p = .042). An index that reflects endorsement of habitual relative to functional responses was a significant predictor of depressive relapse/recurrence (HR = 2.11, p = .029). LIMITATIONS: The current study employed a single measure to identify extreme responses and dysfunctional attitudes. Secondly, various statistical analyses were performed without correcting for multiple testing, which in turn increased the likelihood to finding significant results. CONCLUSIONS: Current study confirmed both methods: People who scored higher on the DAS or had relatively more habitual than functional responses on the extreme positive ends of the DAS had a decreased time to depressive relapse/recurrence.
Reference:
Dysfunctional attitudes or extreme response style as predictors of depressive relapse and recurrence after mobile cognitive therapy for recurrent depression. (Brouwer, Marlies E., Williams, Alishia D., Forand, Nicholas R., DeRubeis, Robert J. and Bockting, Claudi L. H.), In Journal of affective disorders, volume 243, 2019.
Bibtex Entry:
@article{brouwer_dysfunctional_2019,
	title = {Dysfunctional attitudes or extreme response style as predictors of depressive relapse and recurrence after mobile cognitive therapy for recurrent depression.},
	volume = {243},
	copyright = {Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.},
	issn = {1573-2517 0165-0327},
	doi = {10.1016/j.jad.2018.09.002},
	abstract = {BACKGROUND: According to previous research, dysfunctional attitudes and/or scoring extreme on the end-point anchors of questionnaires of dysfunctional  thinking predict depressive relapse/recurrence. Evidence that these two methods  represent a risk for depressive relapse/recurrence is however mixed, due to  differential or poorly defined concepts. The current study aimed to test the two  methods. METHODS: Remitted recurrently depressed patients with low residual  depressive symptoms (N = 264) were recruited as part of a randomized controlled  trial of the effectiveness of mobile Cognitive Therapy for recurrent depression  versus treatment as usual. In the current secondary analysis, Cox regression  models were conducted to test dysfunctional attitudes and extreme responding  variables (assessed on the Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale [DAS]) as predictors of  depressive relapse/recurrence within two years after randomization. RESULTS: Data  from 255 participants were analyzed. Results showed that DAS total scores at  baseline significantly predicted depressive relapse/recurrence (Hazard Ratio  [HR] = 1.01, p = .042). An index that reflects endorsement of habitual relative  to functional responses was a significant predictor of depressive  relapse/recurrence (HR = 2.11, p = .029). LIMITATIONS: The current study employed  a single measure to identify extreme responses and dysfunctional attitudes.  Secondly, various statistical analyses were performed without correcting for  multiple testing, which in turn increased the likelihood to finding significant  results. CONCLUSIONS: Current study confirmed both methods: People who scored  higher on the DAS or had relatively more habitual than functional responses on  the extreme positive ends of the DAS had a decreased time to depressive  relapse/recurrence.},
	language = {eng},
	journal = {Journal of affective disorders},
	author = {Brouwer, Marlies E. and Williams, Alishia D. and Forand, Nicholas R. and DeRubeis, Robert J. and Bockting, Claudi L. H.},
	month = jan,
	year = {2019},
	pmid = {30223139},
	note = {Place: Netherlands},
	keywords = {Chronic Disease, Humans, Recurrence, Female, *Depression, Adult, *Relapse, Male, Middle Aged, Surveys and Questionnaires, *Attitude, *Cognition, *Cognitive behavior therapy, *Extreme responding, *Web-based, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy/*methods, Depression/*psychology/therapy, Depressive Disorder, Major/*psychology/therapy, Mobile Applications, Proportional Hazards Models, Regression Analysis, Treatment Outcome},
	pages = {48--54},
}